Inspiration

I've been finding inspiration for my work everywhere! I adore traditional Eastern art. The work touches the spiritual realm rather than the earthly realm. Things of the earth symbolize the unknown realms to help touch the spirit realm, or heaven if you'd prefer. Sylized forms flow into one another. The amount of detail in decorative elements is overwhelming. I don't know where the artist started. But I suppose they work from big to small, filling in the spaces with smaller and smaller details. As I was researching lanterns here from the US, I could barely find any information. To my surprise, lanterns and candles are essential to Thai identity and visual culture.

Favorites:

printed Buddhist banners

lanterns

spirit houses

Buddhist prayer flags

animal iconography in temples

lacquerware

pasted door prints

traditional dance

melted candles at the altar

 Good and black lacquered door in a temple.

Good and black lacquered door in a temple.

 Golden bunny on a panel on the outside of a temple. Not sure if it's made out of plaster or stone? I researched whether or not the rabbit has any symbolic significance in Buddhism, but our Thai contact said they represent the zodiac.

Golden bunny on a panel on the outside of a temple. Not sure if it's made out of plaster or stone? I researched whether or not the rabbit has any symbolic significance in Buddhism, but our Thai contact said they represent the zodiac.

 Print or drawing framed in a temple. I don't know if it was printed so that multiple of the same image could be made, or if it was done by hand with sumi ink. It appears that some details were down with washed down ink for gray areas, and gold ink was applied as well. I find the attention to detail incredible. I enjoy the emphasis on creating intricate, meditative marks rather than illusionistic space being depicted.

Print or drawing framed in a temple. I don't know if it was printed so that multiple of the same image could be made, or if it was done by hand with sumi ink. It appears that some details were down with washed down ink for gray areas, and gold ink was applied as well. I find the attention to detail incredible. I enjoy the emphasis on creating intricate, meditative marks rather than illusionistic space being depicted.

 Common Buddhist printed banner, called "Kathin", are used traditionally for Buddhist lent. I'm not sure if it's silkscreened or block printed, but the centipede has symbolism for human behavior according to this  link :  "As well as “signalling” the temple’s status to passers-by, the creatures depicted on the flags represent human traits that are frowned on in Buddhist teachings. The centipede signifies anger, Supanna Matcha foolishness and the crocodile greed. Bringing such creatures into the temple is a metaphorical way of overcoming these faults."

Common Buddhist printed banner, called "Kathin", are used traditionally for Buddhist lent. I'm not sure if it's silkscreened or block printed, but the centipede has symbolism for human behavior according to this link:

"As well as “signalling” the temple’s status to passers-by, the creatures depicted on the flags represent human traits that are frowned on in Buddhist teachings. The centipede signifies anger, Supanna Matcha foolishness and the crocodile greed. Bringing such creatures into the temple is a metaphorical way of overcoming these faults."

 Hand-cut fabric banners outside of a temple. The black and white colors represent the late King who was very well-loved and passed away in October. The country is said to mourn him officially for one year and black and white decor around the city honors him.

Hand-cut fabric banners outside of a temple. The black and white colors represent the late King who was very well-loved and passed away in October. The country is said to mourn him officially for one year and black and white decor around the city honors him.

 These banners are common in Chiang Mai. Our Thai contact said these animals represent the zodiac and are not tied specifically to Buddhism. I have come across a few craftspeople who make these while talking on the street and hope to watch how they cut and apply this gold material. These banners are hanging in the temple above alms bowls, which are the offering bowls used by monks. For their daily meal they walk among lay people who give them each food to eat in the alms bowl. 

These banners are common in Chiang Mai. Our Thai contact said these animals represent the zodiac and are not tied specifically to Buddhism. I have come across a few craftspeople who make these while talking on the street and hope to watch how they cut and apply this gold material. These banners are hanging in the temple above alms bowls, which are the offering bowls used by monks. For their daily meal they walk among lay people who give them each food to eat in the alms bowl. 

 Buddhist prayer flags outside of the temple, representing the wheel of life or wheel of dharma. This wheel is specifically Tibetan but commonly found throughout Thailand. They are beautiful and simple! It would be cool to be the person who gets to silkscreen these for a living!

Buddhist prayer flags outside of the temple, representing the wheel of life or wheel of dharma. This wheel is specifically Tibetan but commonly found throughout Thailand. They are beautiful and simple! It would be cool to be the person who gets to silkscreen these for a living!

 
 Saa paper lantern I found in a wickershop. The handmade paper here is often embedded with leaves, grass and flower petals. This is the first example of a Saa paper lantern I found here, most of the others are made with fabric.

Saa paper lantern I found in a wickershop. The handmade paper here is often embedded with leaves, grass and flower petals. This is the first example of a Saa paper lantern I found here, most of the others are made with fabric.

 A classic Thai lantern made from a smooth fabric (perhaps silk). The shape almost reminds me of a jellyfish. I enjoy how the lantern has three separate parts, which opens up the possibilities in my mind of what a lantern can look like. Chinese and Japanese lanterns tend to look more simple in form and focused on the decoration on the surface.

A classic Thai lantern made from a smooth fabric (perhaps silk). The shape almost reminds me of a jellyfish. I enjoy how the lantern has three separate parts, which opens up the possibilities in my mind of what a lantern can look like. Chinese and Japanese lanterns tend to look more simple in form and focused on the decoration on the surface.